Por la manchega llanura

Cervantes’ Quijote towers over all subsequent art and literature in Spanish and is the subject of innumerable songs, poems, stories, artworks and more. It is indeed one of the great achievements of all literature of all time, so it is not surprising that it inspires other artists to use it as a reference accessible to all. This poem by Leon Felipe is taken from the closing episode of Don Quijote, when the knight has been defeated in single combat by Sanson Carrasco, and must return to his home in La Mancha and renounce his knight errantry. Quijote decides to become a shepherd and lead a pastoral life, but of course the book ends with him swiftly falling into despondency and dying shortly after.

The title of the poem is Defeated, and Felipe recognises the defeat of the hero, but he recognises it with admiration and thanks for the fallen hero, and reaffirms that he wishes to follow the example of Quijote.

León Felipe

VENCIDOS
Por la manchega llanura
se vuelve a ver la figura
de Don Quijote pasar.

Y ahora ociosa y abollada va en el rucio la armadura,
y va ocioso el caballero, sin peto y sin espaldar,
va cargado de amargura,
que allá encontró sepultura
su amoroso batallar.
Va cargado de amargura,
que allá «quedó su ventura»
en la playa de Barcino, frente al mar.

Por la manchega llanura
se vuelve a ver la figura
de Don Quijote pasar.
Va cargado de amargura,
va, vencido, el caballero de retorno a su lugar.

¡Cuántas veces, Don Quijote, por esa misma llanura,
en horas de desaliento así te miro pasar!
¡Y cuántas veces te grito: Hazme un sitio en tu montura
y llévame a tu lugar;
hazme un sitio en tu montura,
caballero derrotado, hazme un sitio en tu montura
que yo también voy cargado
de amargura
y no puedo batallar!

Ponme a la grupa contigo,
caballero del honor,
ponme a la grupa contigo,
y llévame a ser contigo
pastor.

Por la manchega llanura
se vuelve a ver la figura
de Don Quijote pasar…

 
From <http://www.poemas-del-alma.com/leon-felipe-vencidos.htm&gt;

Joan Manual Serrat used to sing a version of this poem. Here it is (thank you YouTube).


The Poetry Dude

Advertisements
Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s